Is Abortion Needed to Save the Life of the Mother?

-Elizabeth Dean, D.O. “Hard cases make bad law,” an old legal saying, describes the process by which the United States has found itself with abortion on demand throughout all nine months of pregnancy. Hard cases, for the abortion controversies, include the life or health of the mother, rape, and incest.  Historically, when abortion laws began to be liberalized, protecting the life of the mother was usually included in the justification. Worldwide today, in countries where abortion is prohibited, many include the mother’s life as an exception for which abortion is permitted. In the United States as of 2012 this hard case was rare, cited 0.1% as the reason for the abortion. Is abortion needed to save the life of the mother? Pro-life politicians can get into trouble with the media and the public for offering the opinion that it is not necessary.  In USA Today, 2012, U.S. Rep. Joe Walsh, R-I’ll. Was quoted by reporters as saying that “advances in science and technology had eliminated any need for abortions to save the lives or health of women.”  Further, that “Health of the mother has become a tool for abortions anytime, for any reason.” The medical professionals who were consulted countered.  The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists issued this statement:  “Abortions are necessary in a number of circumstances to save the life of a woman or to preserve health.  Unfortunately, pregnancy is not a risk-free life event. An alternative opinion is offered in a statement issued by the Association of Pro-Life Physicians.  “When the life of the mother is truly threatened by her pregnancy, if both lives cannot simultaneously...

Timeline to Abortion

Margaret Sanger in the Early 1900’s The issues surrounding birth control measures has involved legal decisions and laws dating back to the 16th century worldwide. Early legislators struggled to define the legality of abortion before and after quickening, when the mother starts to feel fetal movements. In the United States, from 1820 to 1900, most abortions were outlawed, primarily through the efforts of the American Medical Association physicians. In 1916 Margaret Sanger, her sister Ethel Byrne, and Fonia Mindell opened the first birth control clinic in Brooklyn, N.Y. They distributed birth control, including also advice and information. All three women were arrested and jailed for violating the Comstock Act (1873), calling these materials obscene. The law was later modified to permit physician-prescribed birth control. Major changes in laws governing birth control and sex education in the U.S. subsequently occurred. Ms. Sanger was a eugenist. Eugenics is a set of beliefs and practices that aims at improving the genetic quality of the human population. It is a social philosophy advocating improvement of human traits by promoting production for people with positive traits (positive eugenics) and decreasing rates of undesirable traits (negative eugenics). Ms. Sanger was an outspoken negative eugenist who said such things as, “Give dysgenic groups (people with bad genes) in our population their choice of segregation or (compulsory) sterilization.” Also, “Birth control must lead ultimately to a cleaner race.” Planned Parenthood Established In the 1940’s, eugenist said and birth-controllers united to form Planned Parenthood. In 1959 the American Law Institute (ALI) drafted a model state abortion law to make legal abortions accessible. The code advocated legalizing abortion for...